More on the Line of Samuel (“One-Eyed Sam”) and Eleanor (“Ellen”) Alexander Rankin: Jean Rankin Heartgrove

First, a really fun fact. I just met a new Rankin cousin – a 4th cousin, once removed, to be exact. She is also descended from Samuel and Eleanor Alexander Rankin. Her family lived in Mecklenburg County, NC, across the Catawba River to the east from the Lincoln/Gaston County Rankins. As a child, her parents took her to visit the then-current resident of the “ancestral” Rankin home in Gaston County – Rev. Frank Bisaner Rankin.

Rev. Frank said that Samuel Rankin was referred to as “One-Eyed Sam.” Rev. Frank didn’t know whether or how Sam lost an eye. Whatever the story behind it, Sam just became fractionally more real as a result. It’s the only personal aspect of him that has come to light.

Moving on: let’s do a little more exploring among One-Eyed Sam and Eleanor’s children. In particular, Jean (sometimes called Jane) Rankin Hartgrove, Samuel and Eleanor’s eldest daughter. I’m going to call her Jean because that name appears four times in her will.

This article has little that is new except citations to sources, an idea whose time may have come — considering the ease and speed with which erroneous information multiplies on the web. Tilting at windmills may also become popular soon. <grin>

Like most eighteenth and nineteenth century women, Jean was largely absent from county records. Exceptions include her father’s will, her marriage bond, a census when she was listed as a head of household, and her husband’s estate records. Also – in a departure from the female norm – she left a will. Before we get to that, here are some basic facts.

  • Jean Rankin Heartgrove is a proved daughter of One-Eyed Sam and Eleanor Alexander Rankin. Her father identified her as a daughter in his will.[1]
  • Her birth date is usually given in online family trees as 1765. The federal censuses – the only evidence I could find of her age in the records – confirm that she was born during 1760 through 1765.[2] Her elder brother William Rankin gave his birth year as 1761 in his Revolutionary War pension application, which suggests she was born during 1762 to 1765.[3]
  • Jean Rankin’s Lincoln County marriage bond to Benjamin Heartgrove was dated Sept. 21, 1792.[4] At minimum, she was 27 years old. One-Eyed Sam’s daughters seemed to marry late. Perhaps he frightened off potential suitors whom he deemed unworthy.
  • Benjamin was listed as a head of household in the federal census in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina for the years 1800, 1810 and 1820.[5] He died intestate in 1826 in Mecklenburg. Administration papers for his estate apparently show at least legatees Robert Wilson, William Walker, Richard Rankin, and Stephen Taylor, who were Benjamin’s four sons-in-law (see discussion of Jean and Benjamin’s children, below).[6]
  • Jean’s allotted dower was 68 acres in Mecklenburg adjacent Thompson Hartgrove, who was listed near Benjamin in some of the censuses.[7] She appeared as a head of household in the 1830 census and died in 1836, when her will was proved.[8]

Jean’s two-page will proves the identities of her four daughters, two sons, and two of her granddaughters. Here is a full transcription, including original spelling (with some bracketed inserts for clarity; underlining added):

“In the name of God Amen I Jean Heartgrove of the County of Mecklinburg and State of North Carolina being Sound in mind and memory but of a weekle Situation Calling to mind the unserty of Life Doe make this my Last will and testament my [body] I commit to the Dust from whence it Came and my Soul I freely Surrender to God who gave it me and as Such worly property as it has please God to Bless me with in this Life and will and Bequeth in manor and form here after mentioned I will to my Daughter Sarah Walker one Doller I will to my Daughter Ann Rankin one Doller I will to my Daughter Polly Taylor one Doller I will to my Daughter Nelly Willson thirty Dollars I will to my Son Ephrim Hartgrove two Hundred and fifty Dollars fifty Dollars to be paid to him yearly by my Exetor I willill to my Son Bengemin Hartgrove three Hundred Dollars fifty dollars to be paid to him Every Year By my Exetor I will to my Daughter Sarah Walker[‘s] Daughter Jean twenty Dollars I allow the Balance of my monne and my Land and Houshold and kitchen furnity and all my estate of Every kind to be Sold and the money to go to the use of my Son Bengemin Hartgrove[‘s] Children all but twenty Dollars and that to go to Polly Taylor[‘s] Daughter Jean. I appoint Robert Willson my Exeutor of this my Last will and testement in witness hereof I have hereunto Set my hand and Seal this twenty Seven Day of August Eighteen Hundr and thirty five.” Witnesses James C.? Rudicell and Stephen Wilson. Jean signed with a mark (“x”).

Finally, here is a very little bit of information about the Hartgrove children and their families. I have not tried to track this line beyond what appears below, in part because my library’s Mecklenburg County resources are scant, and in part because this branch of the Rankin family never made it to the top of the “to-do” list. I also found Jean and Benjamin Heartgrove’s grandchildren very difficult to locate with confidence. It is therefore highly unlikely that I have identified all of this couple’s grandchildren.

If I were descended from the Rankin-Heartgrove line, I would do some serious deep diving into the original Mecklenburg records at the county courthouse and/or the Charlotte-Mecklenburg main library at 310 N. Tryon Street. The library, a really good one with a lot of Mecklenburg microfilm, is located a very short walk from The Dunhill, a charming boutique hotel at 237 N. Tryon Street. When we stayed there in 2001, we were scotch drinkers and had a bottle of Dalwhinnie with us. The first night we stayed there, we returned to our room at 5 p.m. when the library closed, ordered some ice from room service, and had a scotch-and-water before going to dinner.

When we returned to our room at the same time the second night, the ice bucket (which clearly hadn’t been there long because the ice hadn’t begun to melt) was full, and it was set out with two crystal highball glasses and some bottled water next to the bottle of scotch. The routine was repeated every night we were there. There was no extra charge. And that, my friends, is southern hospitality. I don’t want to know what their room rates are now. Or what a bottle of Dalwhinnie costs.

Dragging myself back from that memory to the children of Benjamin and Jean Rankin Heartgrove …

Eleanor (“Nellie”) Heartgrove Wilson, the eldest child, was born about 1793. She married Robert Wilson 29 April 1813 in Mecklenburg.[9] She appeared as a widow and head of household in the 1850 census for Mecklenburg, age 58, along with her probable children Jane (born about 1814), Isaac (about 1825), Amanda (about 1830), and Leroy (about 1836). By the 1860 census, only Jane (described as “insane” in both the 1850 and 1860 censuses) and Leroy were still living at home

The 1850 census shows that Eleanor was living in the Steele Creek area of Mecklenburg, so she may be the Eleanor Wilson who was reportedly buried at the Steele Creek Presbyterian Church, born 20 Dec 1792 (perhaps the wrong year in light of her parents’ marriage date) and died 6 July 1867.[10] There is also a small child named Benjamin H. Wilson (1820-1822) buried in that cemetery who is obviously a pretty good bet to have been her son.

Sarah Heartgrove Walker, 20 Nov 1794 – 7 Nov 1854. I found no marriage record for Sarah and William Walker, although the probate records prove that William was Sarah’s husband.[11] The couple appeared in the 1850 federal census in Mecklenburg with their probable children Robert (born about 1816), Benjamin (1823), Ephraim (about 1827), James (about 1831), Ann (about 1834), and John (about 1836). They also obviously had a daughter Jean, born before 1835, who was named as a legatee in her grandmother’s will.

William and Sarah are both buried in the Sharon Presbyterian Church Cemetery in Charlotte, along with at least two of their sons:

  • Benjamin H. Walker (11 Jan 1823 – 17 Dec 1862), who died at the battle of White Hall in Wayne County, NC.[12]
  • Their eldest son Robert, characterized as “idiotic” in the 1850 census, who also died relatively young. His tombstone is identical to Benjamin’s, which is some evidence that they were members of the same family.[13]
  • There is also a John B. Walker (1836 – 30 June 1862) buried in the Sharon Presbyterian Church Cemetery who was a Civil War casualty, although the tombstone is different than Benjamin’s and Robert’s.[14] He may also be Sarah and William’s son.

Their son Ephraim may be the same man as the Ephraim Walker enumerated in the 1880 federal census in Williamson County, TX. He was born in NC about 1827 and was listed with sons named William, Robert, John B., James A., and Samuel. I know nothing about William and Sarah’s daughters Ann and Jean.

Ann Heartgrove Rankin, 7 Nov 1796 – 30 Jan 1866. Ann married her first cousin Richard Rankin of Lincoln County in Mecklenburg on 18 May 1825.[15] Richard was a son of Jean Rankin Heartgrove’s brother William and his wife Mary Moore Campbell Rankin of Lincoln County.[16] Ann Heartgrove Rankin, unlike her mother Jean Rankin Heartgrove, managed to stay out of the county records entirely after she married. The 1840 census suggests Ann and Richard may have had 5 sons and 2 daughters, assuming all the children under age 15 were theirs.[17] The 1850 census, however, shows only three sons: (1) John D. M. Rankin, born 1830-31, (2) James C. Rankin, born 1832-33, and (3) Ed L. Rankin, born about 1843.

Ann Heartgrove Rankin is buried in Goshen Presbyterian Cemetery in Belmont along with a host of Rankin relatives.[18] Richard (24 Sep 1804 – 14 Sep 1899) married twice more after Ann died[19] and is buried in the Mount Holly City Cemetery[20] along with his third wife Delia Bisaner[21] and their son, Rev. Frank Bisaner Rankin, who left behind a gift to us: One-Eyed Sam’s nickname.[22] Richard and Delia Bisaner Rankin also had a daughter Kathleen A. Rankin.[23]

Polly Heartgrove Taylor was probably born during 1790-1800, based on the census records for Benjamin Heartgrove’s family from 1800 through 1820. She married Stephen Taylor in Mecklenburg County, marriage bond dated 23 March 1826.[24] The Taylors reportedly moved to Tennessee according to online family trees. I haven’t tried to track them, having already learned the frustrations of tracking Taylors, Wilsons and Smiths.

Benjamin Heartgrove was born about 1803-04 according to the 1850 census. He had obviously died by 1860, although I found neither probate records nor a cemetery tombstone for him. Richard Rankin, his first cousin, was guardian of Benjamin’s minor children; the guardianship records are misfiled in the estate folder of Benjamin Sr. at the NC Archives. Benjamin’s wife was Mary Catherine Anthony, Mecklenburg marriage bond dated March 3, 1830.[25] His children were (1) William (born about 1831), (2) James (about 1833), (3) Jane (about 1836), (4) Robert (about 1839), (5) Richard (about 1844), (6) Mary (Oct. 1847 – 26 Jan 1914), and John A. (1850).[26]

Ephraim Hargrove is a mystery. The conventional wisdom is that he was born about 1808. There is an estate file for an Ephraim Hargrove in Mecklenburg dated 1840, although it contains virtually no information. The Mecklenburg records do have a record establishing that James Rankin of Lincoln County (brother of Jean Rankin Heartgrove) was Ephraim’s guardian after his father died, so he was underage in 1826. Benjamin Sr.’s estate file also establishes that James Rankin settled Ephraim’s guardianship account in 1830, which suggests that Ephraim was born in roughly 1809.

That is all I know about the Heartgrove family, although I suspect there is a wealth of additional information in the Mecklenburg records. I hope someone will correct my errors or supplement this scanty information in a comment!

[1] North Carolina State Archives, Box C.R.060.801.21, will of Samuel Rankin dated 16 Dec 1814, proved April 1826, bequeathing daughter Jean Heartgrove $1. Recorded in Lincoln County Will Book 1: 37.

[2] 1810 federal census, Mecklenburg Co., NC, household of Ben Heartgroves, 01001-11201, eldest female (Jean) born by 1765; 1830 federal census, Mecklenburg Co., NC, household of Jean Heartgrove, 00002-000020001, eldest female born 1760-1770. Taken together, the 1810 and 1830 census suggest a birth between 1760 and 1765.

[3] Virgil D. White, Genealogical Abstracts of Revolutionary War Pension Files, Volume III: N-Z (Waynesboro, TN: The National Historical Publishing Co., 1992).

[4] Frances T. Ingmire, Lincoln County North Carolina Marriage Records 1783-1866, Volume II, Females (Athens, GA: Iberian Publishing Co., 1993).

[5] 1800 federal census, Mecklenburg, household of Ben Heartgroves, 00010-40011; 1810 federal census, Mecklenburg, household of Ben Heartgrove, 01001-11201; 1820 federal census, Mecklenburg, household of Ben Hargrove, 011201-00201; 1830 census, Mecklenburg, household of Jean Heartgrove, 00002-00002001.

[6] Ancestry.com, North Carolina, Wills and Probate Records, 1665-1998 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: images from Wills and Estate Papers (Mecklenburg County), 1663-1978, Division of Archives and History (Raleigh, North Carolina). Note that some of the papers in this estate file are misfiled, e.g., records concerning Richard Rankin’s guardianship of the children of their son Benjamin Hartgrove (Jr.).

[7] E.g., 1800 federal census, Mecklenburg, Benjamin Heartgrove listed adjacent Thompson Heartgrove; 1820 federal census, Mecklenburg, sequential listings for Thompson, William, John and Benjamin Hargrove.

[8] 1830 federal census, Mecklenburg Co., NC, household of Jane Hartgrove, 00002-000020001, 3 slaves (eldest female age 60 < 70, born 1760-1770, with two females and two males ages 20 < 30; Brent Holcomb, Mecklenburg Co., NC, Abstracts of Early Wills, 1763-1790 (1980), abstract of Will Book E: 141, will of Jean Hartgrove dated 27 Aug 1835, proved Oct 1836.

[9] Brent H. Holcomb, Marriages of Mecklenburg Co., NC, 1783-1868 (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1981).

[10] https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=Wilson&GSiman=1&GScid=257584&GRid=95564117&

[11] See Notes 6 and 8.

[12] https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=walker&GSiman=1&GScid=1986909&GRid=8998400&

[13] https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=walker&GSiman=1&GScid=1986909&GRid=23997545&

[14] https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=walker&GSiman=1&GScid=1986909&GRid=23997966&

[15] Holcomb, Marriages of Mecklenburg Co., NC.

[16] See 1850 federal census, Lincoln Co., NC, household of Richard Rankin, 45, Ann Rankin, 51 (Ann Heartgrove Rankin, William Rankin, 89, John D. M. Rankin, 19, James C. Rankin, 17, and Ed L. Rankin, 7. William Rankin, One-Eyed Sam’s eldest, was born in 1761. See Virgil D. White, Genealogical Abstracts of Revolutionary War Pension Files, Volume III: N-Z (Waynesboro, TN: The National Historical Publishing Co., 1992), abstract of the pension application of Rankin, William, NC Line, S7342, states that he was born Jan 1761 in Rowan County, North Carolina.

[17] 1840 federal census, Lincoln Co., NC, Richard Rankin, 113001-110001, 5 slaves: 1 male and 1 female born 1800-1810 (Richard and Ann), 3 males born 1825-1830, 1 male and 1 female born 1830-1835, and 1 male and 1 female born 1835-1840

[18] https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=69710926

[19] Richard’s second wife was Caroline LNU, see her tombstone in Goshen Cemetery at https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=Rankin&GSiman=1&GScnty=1686&GSsr=201&GRid=69711053&. See also C.R.040.508.42, file folder “Rankin, Caroline 1874,” containing an oath of Richard Rankin affirming that Caroline Rankin died intestate and he was administrator. Richard married a third time in 1875 to Delia Bisaner, who was less than half his age. See Paul L. Dellinger, Lincoln County, North Carolina Marriage Records 1868—1886 (Lincolnton, NC: 1986).

[20] https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=38892699&ref=acom

[21] https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GSln=Rankin&GSiman=1&GScid=2166251&GRid=38892811&

[22] https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=31082103

[23] 1900 federal census, Gaston Co., River Bend Twp., Stanley Precinct, dwelling 204, listing for Delia Rankin, widowed, b. Aug 1844, with her son Frank B. Rankin b. Nov. 1878 and daughter Cathlene A. Rankin, b. Feb 1880. See also NC death certificate for Mrs. Kathleen Rankin Moore, parents identified as Richard and Delia Rankin, wife of Walter P. Moore.

[24] Brent H. Holcomb, Marriages of Mecklenburg Co., NC, 1783-1868 (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1981).

[25] Id.

[26] 1850 federal census, Hopewell, Mecklenburg, Benj Hargrove, 47, Catherine, 40, William, 19, James, 17, Robert, 11, Richard, 6, Mary, 4, and John, infant; 1860 federal census, Mecklenburg, Mary C. Hartgrove, 51, Robert, 21, Richard, 16, Mary, 14, and John, 11; 1880 federal census, Gaston, dwelling 673, John A. Hartgrove, 29, wife Elizar J., 29, son John W., 3, daughter Zoe E., 1, mother Mary C., 72, and sister Mary O., 33. See also death certificate for Miss Mary Hartgrove, Cleveland Co., NC.

2 thoughts on “”

  1. Thank you for keeping me up to date on your amazing Rankin findings.

    Maybe the spirit of one eyed Sam provided the liquid! Nice thought.

    I shall try very hard to get my search for Thankful Rankin McCain going again.Oh how I wish I could find the grave site for Hance and Thankful.It was great to be able to stand on the land at the grave site of my Robert in McNairy County TN.(thank you for the correct Will Info.on RR) thinking of the long long trail from NC to TN. I would sure like to know how many horses took Robert to Bethel Springs? Maybe even hardy Scot/Irish pony stock.
    (as I typed Scot/I recall my 90 yr old friend from Scotland telling me “Scotch is the liquid,I am a Scot”I find when I get started on the “trail” I stay on the trail.
    You have provided so much based on sound material facts and in a manner that should encourages anyone doing serious family history.The history is amazing,as I have no personal interest in just a collection of names that match.
    Thank you again,

    1. I appreciate the kind words! Please let me know what you find about Thankful and Hance. Do you have my email address?

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