More on the Line of Samuel and Eleanor (“Ellen”) Alexander Rankin: Richard Rankin’s son Samuel

This article is about a Samuel Rankin – just call him “Sam” – who last appeared on this website playing a minor supporting role as the spouse of Mary F. Estes Rankin. She was a daughter of Lyddal Bacon Estes and “Nancy” Ann Allen Winn Estes, whose nine children shared the spotlight in my most recent Estes article. The only mention of Sam in that article was a brief description of him as an “incorrigible character.”

Sam earned that characterization fair and square. First, his year of birth varied so wildly in the census that he must have fibbed about his age for the fun of it. Second, he named a son Napoleon Bonaparte Rankin. What kind of merry prankster lays that on a newborn? Third, I had the very devil of a time trying to identify his parents: it seemed he was being deliberately evasive. I spent months poring over North Carolina records in the library, back when there were virtually no records available online. Fourth, there is evidence that Sam may have been an unmanageable child, but that’s getting ahead of the story.

There isn’t much information in the records about Sam’s adult life. He was a farmer in Tishomingo County, Mississippi, and then he was a farmer in Jefferson County, Arkansas. He and his wife Mary married about 1836 in Tishomingo, moved to Arkansas about 1849, and had ten children who reached adulthood. Sam died in 1861 or early 1862, when his youngest child was on the way. One branch of the family thinks he died in the War, but that is highly unlikely. He was too old to be conscript fodder, four of his sons enlisted, his wife was pregnant, and the National Archives has no record of him.

Let’s begin at the beginning of the search for Sam’s family of origin. A researcher typically starts with two basic questions in the search for an ancestor’s parents: where and when was he/she born? Here are the facts about Sam. Federal censuses prove that he was born in North Carolina.[1] Unfortunately, his birth year is elusive. The 1837 Mississippi state census and the 1840 federal census suggest Sam was born between 1792 and 1820.[2] The 1850 census gives his age as sixty-two, or born about 1788.[3] In the 1860 census, Sam was sixty-one.[4] Thus, during the decade of the 1850s, Sam managed to get a year younger, a skill I wish I could master. If one had to pick a sort of median value, one might guess Sam was born circa 1800.

Mississippi records reveal one other thing: Sam almost certainly had a brother. A William Rankin was listed near Sam in the 1837 state census in Tishomingo County, Mississippi.[5] William did not own any land, but Sam had ten acres under cultivation.[6] Neither man owned any slaves, and they were the only two Rankin heads of household in Tishomingo in 1837 and 1840. William was born between 1800 and 1810, so that he and Sam were probably from the same generation.[7] Finally, William married Rachel Swain, and the JP who performed the ceremony was Sam’s father-in-law Lyddal Bacon Estes.[8] Sam’s wife Mary Estes Rankin had a sister who also married a Swain.[9]

On those facts, it is likely that Sam and William Rankin were brothers and that they were farming Sam’s tract together. If that is correct, then I was looking for a Rankin family having sons named Samuel and William who were born about the turn of the century in North Carolina.

Big whoop. If you have spent any time among the many North Carolina Rankin families, you know the above information is a wretchedly slender reed upon which to hang an ancestor’s identity. I therefore left the records and turned to oral family history. It led me to conclude that Sam’s parents were Richard Rankin and Susanna (“Susy”) Doherty, who were married in 1793 in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina.[10] There is no doubt about the identity of their parents. Richard was a son of Samuel Rankin (“Sam Sr.”) and his wife Eleanor (“Ellen”) Alexander Rankin.[11] Susy Doherty Rankin was a daughter of John Doherty and his wife Agnes, maiden name unknown.[12]

I found the key oral family history in a biography of Claude Allen Rankin, a grandson of Sam and Mary Estes Rankin. Claude reported that his grandfather Sam Rankin “reached manhood in Lincoln County, North Carolina,” and then “removed to Murfreesboro, Tennessee,” which is in Rutherford County.[13]

My instinct told me to accept those facts as the gospel truth. For one thing, the specific locations convey a bulletproof certainty. Moreover, there is no reason on God’s green earth that Claude would have invented those locations out of thin air. Consider the odds: Lincoln is one county out of one hundred in North Carolina; Rutherford is one county out of ninety-five in Tennessee. The odds are therefore 9,500 to one that Claude would have identified both of those counties as places his grandfather Sam had lived in just those two particular states. Claude no doubt heard those locations from his father Elisha Thompson Rankin, who, in turn, learned them from his father Sam.

If Lincoln County, North Carolina and Rutherford County, Tennessee are places where Sam lived, then it is a virtual certainty that Sam was a grandson of Sam Sr. and Eleanor Rankin, who lived in Lincoln (Gaston) County, North Carolina. Three of their sons and one daughter moved to Rutherford County.[14] I have found no other Rankin family that was in both Lincoln and Rutherford counties for the relevant time period.

The search thus boiled down to identifying which of Sam Sr. and Eleanor’s sons could have been the father of Sam. Four of the couple’s sons – William,[15] David,[16] Alexander,[17] and James[18] – are eliminated by their locations and children. The three remaining sons – Robert, Sam Jr. and Richard – were possibilities to be Sam’s father.

I started with Richard Rankin and his wife Susy Doherty because Sam and Mary named their eldest son Richard, and the Anglo naming tradition dictates naming the first son for his paternal grandfather.[19] Richard and Susy lived on Long Creek in Mecklenburg County, just across the Catawba River from the home of Sam Sr. and Eleanor in Lincoln (now Gaston) County.[20] Richard’s brother Sam Jr. also lived in Mecklenburg with his first wife, Susy’s sister Mary (“Polly”) Doherty.[21] Richard Rankin and his sister-in-law Polly Doherty Rankin are buried at Hopewell Presbyterian Church on Beatties Ford Road, just northwest of Charlotte, alongside John Doherty, father of Susy Doherty Rankin and Polly Doherty Rankin.[22] Richard’s headstone is in the left foreground of the photograph below, which is the banner photo for this website. The headstones of Richard’s sister-in-law and father-in-law are in the right foreground.

Richard and Susy appeared in the 1800 census for Mecklenburg with three sons and a daughter, all born between 1794 and 1800.[23] The “family tree” of Sam Sr. and Eleanor (a somewhat mysterious source mentioned in Gregg Moore’s book about Sam Sr.’s family) indicates that Richard and Susy had five children, one of whom was born between 1800 and 1804.[24] Only four children survived until 1807, however. In April of that year, the Court of Common Pleas & Quarter Sessions for Mecklenburg County appointed Richard’s brother Sam Jr. as guardian of Richard’s four children: Joseph, Samuel, Mary and William Rankin.[25]

When I found that record in a Clayton Library abstract, I sprang from my chair and did a little victory jig, earning some disapproving glares from a couple of blue-haired ladies at the next table. It was my first real break in the search for Sam’s family of origin. First, it eliminated Sam Jr. as a candidate to be my Sam’s father. Second, it put Richard and Susy at the very front of the pack, since they had sons named Sam and William. After tracking Richard’s brother Robert from Rutherford County, Tennessee to Shelby County, Illinois and identifying some of his children, I concluded that Richard was the only son of Sam Sr. and Eleanor who could have been the father of my great-great grandfather Sam.

I don’t know how Richard Rankin died, although the fact that he was only thirty-five and left no will indicates his death was probably sudden and unexpected. He was a sheriff, patroller, justice of the peace and tax collector, all public positions of trust and responsibility; he ran unsuccessfully for other county offices (coroner and high sheriff).[26] He had a hard time managing money in the course of performing his official duties, because the court had to haul him up short more than once.[27] Unfortunately, that was a harbinger of things to come.

Richard died up to his eyeballs in debt, although that wasn’t immediately apparent. Right after he died, Richard seemed to have been a reasonably well-to-do man. The estate administrator’s bond was either £1,000 or £2,000, neither of which was inconsequential.[28] The sale of his estate (excluding land) brought in £935.[29] The 1806 and 1807 Mecklenburg tax lists indicate that Richard’s estate owned 800 acres there.[30] The honorific “Esquire” with which he appeared in court records squares with the image of a prosperous and respected man.

Reality soon reared its ugly head in the form of lawsuits and  jugments against Richard’s estate. I quit taking notes on these suits, although there were many more, after the trend became painfully obvious.

October 1804, Andrew Alexander’s Administrator v. Richard Rankin’s Admr., verdict for plaintiffs, damages of £103.50.[31]

April 1805, William Blackwood’s Administrators v. Richard Rankin’s Admr., verdict for plaintiffs, damages of £38.18.1.[32]

April 1805, Robert Lowther v. Richard Rankin’s Admrs., verdict for Plaintiff, damages of £34.18.9.[33]

January 1806, Trustee Etc. v. Richard Rankin’s Admrs., verdict for Plaintiffs, damages of £18.9.0.[34]

October 1807, Richard Kerr v. Richard Rankin’s Admrs., judgment for Plaintiff for £7.15.9.[35]

Here is the most depressing court record of them all. Creditors finally had to go after Richard’s land because the estate had no more liquid assets with which to discharge judgments:

Oct 1807, John Little v. Richard Rankin’s Admrs, judgment and execution levied on land for £16, administrator pleads no assets. Ordered that the clerk issue scire facias against Samuel Rankin, guardian of the heirs, to show cause.[36]

The minute book abstract is silent regarding the purpose of the show cause hearing. In context, it is clear that Sam Jr. was to show cause, if any, why Richard’s land should not be sold to pay the judgment creditor. Sam Jr. made no such showing, because the Mecklenburg real property records contain a sheriff’s deed dated October 1807 reciting as follows:

“[B]y execution against the lands of Richard Rankin, dec’d … being divided by the administrator and Samuel Rankin off a tract of 500 acres held by Richard Rankin … [the tract sold] containing 200 acres including the old house, spring, meadow and bottom on both sides Long Creek.”[37]

Wherever Susy and her children were living, it was clearly not in the “old house.” Some of Richard’s land remained after this sale, but I did not attempt to track its inevitable and dreary disposition.

It eventually dawned on me that I was mucking about exclusively in the records of Mecklenburg County looking for evidence of Susy’s family. However, Claude Allen Rankin’s biography said that Sam “reached manhood” in Lincoln County, not Mecklenburg. I belatedly went to the Lincoln records looking for evidence regarding Susy’s whereabouts after Richard died.

Lo and behold: Susy was living in Lincoln County by at least 1808, when she was a defendant there in a lawsuit.[38] I did not find her listed as a head of household in the 1810 census, although she was alive until at least 1812.[39] The family was undoubtedly still residing in Lincoln County in October 1812, when the Lincoln court ordered that “Samuel Rankin, about thirteen years old, an orphan son of Richard Rankin, dec’d be bound to John Rhine until he arrive to the age of 21 years to learn the art and mistery [sic] of a tanner.”[40]

If the indentured Sam Rankin was the same man as my ancestor Sam Rankin, which is highly likely, then there is no doubt that Sam “reached manhood” in Lincoln County, as Claude said. That is where John Rhyne lived, and the indenture lasted until Sam reached legal age.[41]

Sam’s indentured servitude was not an unusual fate for a destitute child whose father had died. Five years before the indenture, it was abundantly clear that Richard Rankin’s estate was rapidly vanishing. None of Richard’s other three surviving children were indentured, however, which is puzzling. Why just Sam? And why wasn’t he indentured earlier?

Perhaps Sam had become incorrigible – the child who was designated to “act out” the Rankin children’s collective anger and grief at the loss of their father and economic status. It would certainly go a long way toward explaining a man who didn’t marry until his late thirties and who named a son Napoleon Bonaparte. Perhaps it would also explain why the prominent and wealthy Rankin family of Lincoln County did not prevent the indenture of a 13-year-old Rankin whose father died when he was five. Indentured grandsons/nephews don’t exactly enhance a family’s reputation in the community.

Nothing like a strict German master to straighten out a wild Scots-Irish teenage boy, I guess.

Whatever Sam’s temperament, or the reason his rich Rankin relatives consented sub silentio to his indenture, his mother Susy had been having an abjectly miserable time of it. In 1803, she lost her sister Mary Doherty Rankin, the wife of Richard’s brother Sam Jr.[42] In 1804, her husband Richard died, leaving her with minor children.[43] One of their children also died, because (according to the Rankin “family tree”) Richard and Susy had five children: the court appointed a guardian for only four in 1807.[44] Also in that year, Susy’s mother Agnes Doherty died[45] and a part of Richard’s land was sold to pay a judgment debt.[46] In 1809, Susy sold via a quitclaim deed her dower right to a life estate in one-third of Richard’s land.[47] Do you think she may have needed cash?

In the midst of those excruciating losses, Susy’s brother-in-law William Rankin (and former co-administrator of Richard’s estate) sued her.[48] In 1808, William obtained a judgment against Susy for £106.7.6, about half of which he collected by garnishing the funds of a man who owed Susy money.[49] William is enumerated in the 1810 census (immediately followed in the list by Thomas Rhyne, John Rhyne, and Samuel Rankin (Sr.), which indicates geographic proximity) with eleven slaves, so the suit against Susy was obviously not a matter of economic need. I trust that his orphaned nephews and niece were not going hungry. He was obviously a vengeful and greedy sonuvabitch, and I don’t like him one whit. Whatever Susy’s sins may have been, Richard’s children deserved better from his brother.

As for Susy, I haven’t found a worse record of persistent and pernicious emotional and financial calamity among any of my other ancestors. If she managed to remain moderately sane through all that, she must have had some backbone. However, she evidently couldn’t cope with her son Sam, about age thirteen.

It turns out that John Rhyne, to whom Sam was bound, was connected to the family of Sam Sr. and Eleanor Rankin. William Rankin (the mean SOB) and his son Richard Rankin both witnessed the will of John Rhyne’s father Thomas.[50] Thomas Rhyne was bondsman for William’s marriage bond to Anne Moore Campbell. The Rhynes lived on land adjacent to Samuel Sr. and Eleanor’s plantation on Kuykendall Creek (later renamed “Dutchman’s Creek”).[51] Susy’s son Sam Rankin therefore served about four years of his indenture within walking distance of his wealthy grandfather Sam Sr.[52] No wonder Sam declined to pass on his given name to any of his eight sons. Sam did, however, have children who shared the name of each of his three surviving siblings: Joseph, William and Mary.

Sam probably remained with his master John Rhyne through the 1820 census.[53] There was a male age 16-26 listed with Rhyne that year who was not the Rhynes’ child and who would most likely have been Sam, the indentured tanner, born about 1799.[54] The 1820 census for John Rhyne also indicates that one person in the household was engaged in manufacturing, and tanning was deemed a manufacturing business.

Meanwhile, some of the Lincoln/Mecklenburg Rankins had begun moving to Rutherford County, Tennessee in the early 1800s. Richard’s brother David and his wife Anne Moore Campbell may have been in Rutherford by August 1806, when David acquired a tract there.[55] In 1810, both David and his brother Robert Rankin appeared on the Rutherford County tax rolls.[56] By the 1820 census, David, Robert and their brother Sam Jr. were all listed as heads of households in Rutherford County.[57] Sam undoubtedly made a beeline for Tennessee the day he turned twenty-one: recall that his uncle Sam Jr. had been Sam’s guardian, and his siblings may have migrated with Sam Jr.

For various reasons, I vacillated for years as to whether my great-great grandfather Sam Rankin was, in fact, a son of Richard and Susy and grandson of Sam Sr. and Eleanor Alexander Rankin. At bottom, all I had were Claude’s oral family history, family migration from North Carolina to Rutherford County, a guardianship record, an indenture, and the name of Sam’s brother. Most disconcerting is the fact that Sam Rankin essentially disappeared from all records after that 1812 indenture until he showed up in Tishomingo County – a lapse of a quarter-century. That would make anyone uneasy. Fortunately, Y-DNA testing resolved my uncertainty. My first cousin Allen Rankin is a close match to proved descendants of Samuel Sr. and Eleanor.

MORAL: if you are a Rankin male (or have a Rankin male relative) and you/he have not done Y-DNA testing, please go to FTDNA.com ASAP, sign up for a 37-marker or 67-marker test, and join the Rankin DNA project. There are now enough participants in the project that you are almost certain to find a Rankin match, assuming there is no “non-paternal” event among your male Rankin line (e.g., an adoption or illegitimate birth). I would be thrilled to help you and to provide whatever information I have about your Rankins.

See you on down the road!

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

[1] 1850 federal census, Jefferson Co., AR, dwelling 426, Samuel Rankin, born NC; 1860 federal census, Jefferson Co., AR, dwelling 549, Samuel Rankin, born NC. Several of Sam’s children lived to be counted in the 1880 census, which asked where each person’s parents were born. Sam’s children fairly consistently identified their father’s state of birth as North Carolina. E.g., 1880 census, Dorsey (Cleveland) Co., AR, dwelling 99, Richard Rankin, 43, b. MS, father b. NC, mother b. AL.

[2] Laverne Stanford, Tishomingo County Mississippi 1837 State Census, 1845 State Census (Ripley, MS: Old Timer Press, 1981), Samuel Rankin, age 21 < 45, born 1792-1819; 1840 federal census, Tishomingo Co., MS, Samuel Rankin, age 20 < 30, born 1810-1820.

[3] See note 1, 1850 federal census, Samuel Rankin, age 62.

[4] See note 1, 1860 federal census, Samuel Rankin, age 61.

[5] Stanford, Tishomingo County Mississippi 1837 State Census, listing # 54 for William Rankins, age 21 < 45, a female > 16, no slaves, and no acreage under cultivation.

[6] Id., listing # 64 for Samuel Rankins, age 21 < 45, no slaves, 10 acres under cultivation.

[7] 1840 census, Tishomingo Co., MS, listing for William Rankin, 1 male 30 < 40 (born 1800-1810) and 1 female 60 < 70 (born 1770-1780). The woman with William in the 1837 and 1840 census, which were taken before William married in 1843, may have been his mother.

[8] Irene Barnes, Marriages of Old Tishomingo County, Mississippi,Volume I 1837 – 1859 (Iuka, MS: 1978), marriage bond for William Rankin and Rachel Swain dated 7 Sep 1843, married by L. B. Estes, J.P., on 14 Sep 1843. Lyddal Bacon Estes was Sam Rankin’s father-in-law.

[9] Martha Ann Estes, Mary Estes Rankin’s sister, was married to Wilson Swain.

[10] Brent H. Holcomb, Marriages of Mecklenburg Co., NC, 1783-1868 (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1981).

[11] Richard was not named in his father Sam Sr.’s will because Richard predeceased Sam Sr., but other evidence is conclusive. First, William and Alexander Rankin, proved sons of Sam Sr. and Eleanor, were administrators of Richard’s estate along with Richard’s wife Susy. NC State Archives, C.R.065.508.210, Mecklenburg County Estates Records, 1762 – 1957, n.d. Queen – Rankin, file folder labeled “Rankin, Richard 1804,” original bond of Susy, William, and Alexander Rankin, administrators of the estate of Richard Rankin. Second, Samuel Rankin Jr. (another proved son of Sam Sr. and Eleanor) was the guardian for Richard’s children after Richard died. Herman W. Ferguson, Mecklenberg County, North Carolina Minutes of the Court of Pleas Volume 2, 1801-1820 (Rocky Mount, NC: 1995), abstract of Minute Book 4: 663, court order of April 1807 appointing Samuel Rankin guardian for the children of Richard Rankin.

[12] Herman W. Ferguson and Ralph B. Ferguson, Mecklenburg County, North Carolina Will Abstracts, 1791-1868, Books A-J, and Tax Lists, 1797, 1798, 1799, 1806, & 1807 (Rocky Mount, NC: 1993), abstract of Will Book C: 21, will of John Doherty of Mecklenburg dated 20 May 1786 naming wife Agnes, son James, and daughters Susanna and Mary; id., Will Book C: 34, will of Agnes Doherty of Mecklenburg dated June 19, 1807, proved Jan. 1808, naming daughter Susanna Rankin and granddaughters Violet and Nelly Rankin. The latter were children of Sam Rankin Jr. and his wife Polly Doherty, who died before her mother Agnes.

[13] D. Y. Thomas, Arkansas and Its People, A History, 1541 – 1930, Volume IV (New York: The American Historical Society, Inc., 1930), biography of Claude Allen Rankin at p. 574.

[14] Sam Sr. and Eleanor’s children who moved to Rutherford County were David, Robert, Samuel Jr., and Eleanor Rankin Dixon. Eleanor Rankin married Joseph Dixon; David Rankin married Jane Moore Campbell, a widow. Jean or Jane Rankin, another daughter of Sam Sr. and Eleanor, married James Rutledge. The Rutherford County records are full of entries in which the Rankins were associated with Dixons, Rutledges and Moores. E.g., WPA Tennessee Records Project, Records of Rutherford County, Tennessee Vol. C, Minutes 1808 – 1810 (Murfreesboro: 1936), abstract of Minute Book C: 197, entry of 1 Jan 1810 regarding a lawsuit styled William Dickson v. Robert Rankin, George Moore, Robert Rutledge and Joseph Dickson, Jr.

[15] William Rankin, the eldest son of Sam Sr. and Eleanor Rankin, remained in Lincoln County and did not have a son named Samuel. See A. Gregg Moore & Forney A. Rankin, The Rankins of North Carolina (Marietta, GA: A. G. Moore, 1997).

[16] Id. David Rankin and his family moved to Rutherford County. Their son Samuel King Rankin, born 1818, is not the same man as the Sam who married Mary F. Estes.

[17] Id. Alexander Rankin remained in Lincoln and had no son named Samuel.

[18] James Rankin had a son named Samuel, but he was born in 1819 and married Nancy Beattie. See also NC State Archives, CR.060.508.105, Lincoln County Estate Records, 1779 – 1925, Ramsour, George – Rankin, John, file folders for James Rankin labeled 1832 and 1842, naming the heirs of James Rankin as Robert, Rufus, Caroline, James, Louisa, Samuel, Richard, and Mary Rankin.

[19] Sam and Mary F. Estes Rankin’s children were, in order, Richard Bacon Rankin, William Henderson Rankin, Joseph Rankin, John Allen Rankin, Elisha (“Lish”) Thompson Rankin, James Darby Rankin, Mary Jane Rankin, Washington (“Wash”) Marion Rankin, Napoleon (“Pole”) Bonaparte Rankin, and Frances Elizabeth (“Lizzie”) Rankin.

[20] Microfilm of Mecklenburg County Deed Book 18: 365, Sheriff’s deed dated Oct. 1807, execution against the lands of Richard Rankin, dec’d, 200 acres off a tract of 500 acres owned by Rankin crossing Long Creek, widow’s right of dower excepted.

                  [21] Holcomb, Marriages of Mecklenburg, Nov. 16, 1791 marriage bond of Samuel Rankin and Mary Doherty, bondsman Richard Rankin (Sam Jr.’s brother); 1800 federal census, Mecklenburg Co., NC, household of Samuel Rankin, 1 male age 26<45 (Sam Jr., born 1755-1774), 1 female same age, 3 males < 10, and 2 females < 10.

[22] Charles William Sommerville, The History of Hopewell Presbyterian Church (Charlotte, NC: 1939, 1981). This source incorrectly states that Richard Rankin was married to Mary (nicknamed “Polly”) Doherty Rankin because their graves are side-by-side. The records, however, are clear that Richard married Susy Doherty, Sam Jr. married Polly Doherty, and Richard’s surviving widow Susy was still alive after Polly died.

[23] 1800 federal census, Mecklenburg Co., NC, Richard Rankin, age 26 < 45, with four children under the age of ten, a female 26 < 45, and a female > 45, most likely Richard’s widowed mother-in-law Agnes Doherty.

[24] The Rankin “family tree” is referred to as a source in Moore and Rankin, The Rankins of North Carolina.

[25] Ferguson, Mecklenberg Court Minutes, abstract of Minute Book 4: 663, April 1807 order appointing Samuel Rankin guardian of Joseph, Mary, Samuel and William Rankin, orphans of Richard Rankin, dec’d. “Orphan” just meant fatherless. Susy, the children’s mother, was still alive in 1807.

[26] Id., Minute Book 4: 314, entry in Oct 1801 recording votes for the election of two coroners (John Patterson 11 votes, Robert Robison 8 votes, Richard Rankin 2 votes); Minute Book 4: 375, Oct 1802, Richard Rankin was appointed “Patroller” by the court, having authority to search for and recover runaway slaves; Minute Book 4:387, Jan 25 1803, Richard Rankin et al. “being commissioned by his excellency the Governor to act as Justice of the Peace in this county, appeared in open court and was duly qualified as by law accordingly;” Minute Book 4: 397, Jan 1803, records of the County Trustee indicated that Richard Rankin was sheriff, 1797-1798; Minute Book 4: 409, Apr 1803, Magistrates appointed to take tax returns included Richard Rankin; Minute Book 4: 421, Jul 1803 election for high sheriff (7 votes for Wm Beaty, 5 for Richard Rankin).

[27] Id., Mecklenburg Minute Book 4: 281, entry for Apr 1801, notice issued to Richard Rankin, former sheriff, to appear and show cause why he hasn’t satisfied a judgment; id., Minute Book 4: 300, entry of Jul 1801, motion of County Trustee, Richard Rankin ordered to appear and render to the trustee all money due him for county tax & stray money collected by Richard for 1797 and 1798. Richard confessed judgment for £104.12.2.

[28] Ferguson, Mecklenburg Court Minutes, abstract of Minute Book 4: 458, April 1804, ordered that Susannah Rankin, William Rankin and Alexander Rankin administer on the estate of Richard Rankin, Esquire, dec’d, bond of £2,000. Another record shows the bond as £1,000. See North Carolina Archives, C.R.060.801.21, copy of original bond.

[29] Ferguson, Mecklenburg Court Minutes, abstract of Minute Book 4: 478, Jul 1804 inventory and amount of sale of the estate of Richard Rankin returned by William Rankin, Alexander Rankin and Susy Rankin, £ 935.1.11.

[30] Ferguson and Ferguson, Mecklenburg County, North Carolina Will Abstracts, abstract of the 1806 and 1807 tax lists, entry for Richard Rankin’s estate, adm. by Wm. B. Alexander, 800 acres.

[31] Ferguson, Mecklenburg Court Minutes, abstract of Minute Book 4: 501.

[32] Id., Minute Book 4: 530.

[33] Id., Minute Book 4: 531.

[34] Id., Minute Book 4: 592.

[35] Id., Minute Book 4: 704.

[36] Id., Minute Book 4: 706.

[37] FHL Film No. 484,186, Mecklenburg Deed Book 18: 365.

[38] Anne Williams McAllister & Kathy Gunter Sullilvan, Courts of Pleas & Quarter Sessions, Lincoln County, North Carolina, Apr 1805 – Oct 1808 (Lenoir, NC: 1988), William Rankin v. Susy Rankin, court case record for Jan 1808. The county court had no jurisdiction over a defendant who was not a resident of the county, so the fact that Susy was sued in Lincoln and the case was not dismissed for lack of jurisdiction proves that she lived there.

[39] Ferguson, Mecklenburg Court Minutes, abstract of Minute Book 5: 277, entry of Aug 1812, on petition of Susannah Rankin, widow of Richard Rankin, regarding her right of dower in the land of her deceased husband. Although a court did not have jurisdiction over a nonresident defendant, anyone could petition a county court for relief, whether a resident or not. The land in which Susy had a dower right was located in Mecklenburg. She therefore had to file in that county and nowhere else in order to assert her dower right.

[40] North Carolina State Archives CR.060.301.4, “Lincoln County, County Court Minutes Jan 1806 – Jan 1813” at p. 589.

[41] 1820 census, Lincoln Co., p. 224, listing for John Rhyne.

[42] Sommerville, History of Hopewell Presbyterian Church, tombstone of Mary (“Polly”) Doherty inscribed, “Here lies Polly Rankin, died Jan. 30, 1803 in her 33rd year. She left 5 motherless children and a discomfortable husband.”

[43] See notes 25 and 28.

[44] See note 25, appointment of guardian for four children of Richard Rankin; Gregg & Forney, Rankins of North Carolina, citing the Rankin “family tree.” None of Richard and Susy’s children were of age in 1807, since they were married in 1793. Thus, all of their living children would have required a guardian in 1807.

[45] Ferguson & Ferguson, Mecklenburg Will Abstracts, Will Book C: 34, will of Agnes Doherty dated June 19, 1807, proved Jan 1808, naming daughter Susanna Rankin.

[46] See note 37, sheriff’s deed for part of Richard Rankin’s land.

[47] FHL Film No. 484,186, Mecklenburg Deed Book 19: 606, quit claim deed dated 15 Apr 1809 from Susy Rankin, widow and relict of Richard Rankin of Mecklenburg, $200, to David Smith, her right of dower in all land which her late husband died owning.

[48] See note 38.

[49] Anne Williams McAllister and Kathy Gunter Sulliver, Court of Pleas & Quarter Sessions Lincoln County, North Carolina April 1805 – October 1808 (1988), abstract of court minutes for January 1808, William Rankin v. Susy Rankin, jury awarded plaintiff damages of £106.7.6, of which judgment was rendered against Samuel Lowrie Esq. for £48.16.

[50] Miles S. Philbeck & Grace Turner, Lincoln County, North Carolina, Will Abstracts, 1779-1910 (Chapel Hill, NC: 1986), abstract of Lincoln Will Book 1: 405, will of Thomas Rhyne naming inter alia son John Rhyne, witnessed by William Rankin and Richard Rankin, 2 Jun 1834.

[51] E.g., microfilm of Lincoln Co. Deed Book 2: 543, deed of 19 Apr 1780 from James Coburn of Lincoln to Samuel Rankin, same, 180A on Kuykendall’s Cr. adjacent Thomas Rhine’s corner.

[52] NC State Archives, C.R.060.801.21, Lincoln County Wills, 1769 – 1926 Quickle – Reep, file folder labeled “Rankin, Samuel 1826,” original will of Samuel Rankin of Lincoln County dated 16 Dec 1814, proved April 1826, recorded in Will Book 1: 37. According to a transcription of Sam Sr.’s tombstone, now lost, he died in 1816.

[53] 1820 census, Lincoln Co., NC, p. 350, listing for John Rhyne, 26 < 45, 1 female 26 < 45, 1 male 16 < 26, 4 males < 10 and 2 females < 10; one person engaged in manufacturing.

[54] John Rhyne didn’t marry until 1808, so it is fairly certain that the male in the 16 < 26 age bracket listed with him in the 1820 was not John’s son. Frances T. Ingmire, Lincoln County North Carolina Marriage Records 1783-1866, Volume I, Males (Athens, GA: Iberian Publishing Co., 1993).

[55] Helen C. & Timothy R. Marsh, Land Deed Genealogy of Rutherford County, Tennessee, Vol. 1 (1804 – 1813) (Greenville, SC: Southern Historical Press, 2001), abstract of Deed Book A: 194.

[56] FHL Film No. 24,806, Item 3, Tax List, 1809-1849, Rutherford County, Tennessee.

[57] 1820 census, Rutherford Co., TN, listings for Robert Rankin (p. 109), David Rankins (p. 121), and two listings for Samuel Rankin (p. 94 and p. 116).

Part One: Line of James Rankin, son of Samuel and Eleanor (“Ellen”) Alexander Rankin

Thanks to an uncharacteristic case of indecision, I have prepared this descendant chart in two different formats. This chart — Part One — is a bare outline, except for some notes about Samuel and Eleanor (“Ellen”) Alexander Rankin and their son James. The other format, which I will probably post within the week, is an expanded outline chart that includes census records and other source information.

As a practical matter, this is essentially a chart for the line of William Rufus Rankin, a son of James and Mary Johnson Rankin and a grandson of Samuel and Eleanor. That is because the other children of James and Mary apparently left North Carolina and were not easy to identify with much confidence.

I would appreciate any feedback about these two formats. Some people seem to like detailed source information; some don’t. Let me know.

Almost all of the information in this chart came from the following sources:

  • Federal census records, available online free from Family Search at this link — https://familysearch.org/catalog/search — and for a price from Ancestry.com at this link, http://home.ancestry.com.
  • North Carolina death certificates, available at both of the above websites. They may seem a somewhat macabre source, but they are full of valuable and usually reliable evidence. Most death certificates identify the deceased’s parents, dates and places of birth and death, identity of a surviving spouse, occupation, address, place of burial, and the name of the person who provided information for the death certificate.
  • North Carolina marriage records, also available at both Family Search and Ancestry. Many provide date and county of marriage, identity of parents, and ages and residences of the bride and groom. Some just provide names and date of marriage.
  • Findagrave.com. This website, which is free, often includes an obituary for twentieth century deaths, providing another good source of information. The website also frequently adds names of parents, siblings and children, although sources are not provided for that information. So far as this particular Rankin line is concerned, Findagrave has been pretty reliable except for a few obvious errors. Finding a second source for the information at this website is a good idea. For the record, the vast majority of the Rankins in this chart are buried in Gaston County in either the Goshen Grove Cemetery, New Hope Presbyterian Cemetery, Oakwood Cemetery, Hollywood Cemetery, or Hillcrest Gardens Cemetery.
  • Other sources at Ancestry.com. For example, replacement birth certificates, Social Security applications, city directories, draft registration forms and – even more fun, because they frequently include pictures – school yearbooks.

I have not relied on any compiled family histories for this information, including either family trees available online or a history of this line contained in a book written by Greg Moore and A. Forney Rankin (which is apparently no longer available online). If anyone spots errors, I would appreciate corrections, provided they are supported by citations to actual records rather than to undocumented family trees.

A substantial number of the Rankins identified in this chart remained in Gaston County, NC for the better part of a century after James died. This is often a clue that the family was quite well-to-do: 19th century families who didn’t inherit wealth frequently moved on west and south, looking for cheap land or other opportunities. In this family’s case, Samuel Rankin left each of his surviving children $1, except for his daughter Anne/Anna Rutledge (to whom Samuel bequeathed two cows) and his son James. The dollar bequests don’t mean Samuel was cheap or that he disliked his children. The small bequests were an attempt to forestall a will contest based on the theory that the testator accidentally “overlooked” a child who wasn’t a named beneficiary. I suspect that Samuel provided for most of his children long before he wrote his will.

As for James, Samuel’s will provided as follows: “son James Rankin and his heirs, the plantation where I now live … my sorrel horse and all my stock of cattle and sheep and my bed and furniture and all my household and kitchen furniture of every kind likewise one large kettle and one flax [wheel?].” Thus, James inherited essentially all of Samuel’s remaining assets. I haven’t been into the Lincoln County deed records, but Samuel may have already disposed of much of his estate via sale or gift deed (or gifts of cash, which wouldn’t appear in the records) before writing his will. In any event, Samuel and Eleanor’s sons who remained in Lincoln were quite wealthy – James, William and Alexander – as indicated by their ownership of land and slaves.

Without further ado, here is the short form of the chart. I hope it helps someone knock down a Rankin brick wall!

1 Samuel Rankin, 1734 – 1816, wife Eleanor (“Ellen”) Alexander Rankin, 1740 – 1802. These dates of birth and death disagree with those given by most Rankin researchers. They are from Goshen Grove Presbyterian Cemetery inscriptions transcribed on FHL Microfilm #882,938. The film contains a pre-1914 cemetery inscription survey; the Historical Records Survey Service Division of the WPA prepared the transcription. Samuel Rankin’s tombstone has long since disappeared, but his wife Eleanor’s was still standing in the late 1990s.

For Samuel Rankin’s original will, see North Carolina State Archives File Box C.R.060.801.21. Recorded in Lincoln County Will Book 1: 37. The will names children William, Jean Hargrove/Hartgrove, Samuel, David, Robert, Alexander, Ann Rutledge, Eleanor Dickson and James. A tenth child, Richard Rankin, predeceased Samuel but is proved by strong circumstantial evidence.

2 James Rankin, b. 1775-1780, d. 1832-1833. Wife Mary (“Polly”) Johnson. For source information on this couple, see below …

  • 1820 census, Lincoln Co., NC, p. 350, James Rankin, 30001-10011. Male 26 < 46, female > 45, female 26 < 45, 3 males < 10, 1 female < 10. James, the eldest male, was b. 1775-1794.
  • 1830 census, Lincoln Co., NC, p. 231, James Rankin, 12020011-101001, shows James in the age 50 < 60 bracket, b. 1770-1780. Combining the 1830 and 1820 census info, James was born 1775-1780.
  • North Carolina State Archives, File Box C.R.060.801.21, “Lincoln County Wills, 1769 – 1926 Quickle – Reep,” file folder labeled “James Rankin 1832.” Folder contains the original will of James Rankin dated 27 Nov 1832, proved Jan 1833. Recorded in Lincoln Co. Will Book 1: 273.
  • File folder labeled “James Rankin 1832” also contains a document showing the division of his estate in eight lots to his heirs Robert Rankin, Rufus Rankin, Caroline Rankin, James Rankin, Louisa Rankin, Samuel Rankin, Richard J. Rankin, and Mary Rankin.

3 Robert Rankin, b. abt 1815, Lincoln Co., NC, d. after 1880, Crawford Co., AR.

4 Amzi Alexander Rankin, b. 14 Mar 1853, Woodlawn, Gaston Co., NC, d. 23 Jun 1914, Muscogee, Moscogee Co., OK.

4 Charles Rankin, b. abt 1856-57, Gaston Co., NC, died before 1900.

4 Robert Rankin, b. abt 1858, Gaston Co., NC, died before 1870.

4 Mary D. Rankin, b. abt 1860-61, Gaston Co., NC. Married a Mr. Holt, Lived in Cheotah, McIntosh Co., OK at least 1914 – 1930.

4 Alice W. Rankin, b. 1863, Gaston Co., NC, d. 1945, McIntosh Co., OK. Husband William T. McNeely (1860-1914).

4 Ada B. Rankin, b. Sep 1863, Gaston Co., NC. Husband Thomas E. Cason, Crawford Co., AR.

4 Robert E. Rankin, b. Sep 1866, Gaston Co., NC. Lived McIntosh Co., OK as of 1930.

5 Wiley Edward Rankin, b. 31 Dec 1890, Checotah, OK, d. 1945, Wheat Ridge, Jefferson Co., CO.

4 Richard Arthur Rankin, b. May 1871, Crawford Co., AR, to McIntosh, Muscogee and Osage Co., OK.

3 Caroline Rankin.

3 James A. Rankin, b. 25 Jun 1829, Lincoln, d. 2 Aug 1881 in Cass Co., TX, buried Upton Co., TX.

3 Samuel Rankin, b. abt. 1821.

3 Louisa Rankin, b. abt 1827.

3 Richard J. Rankin, b. abt. 1830.

3 Mary Rankin, possibly m. Robert Beaty. To Bowie and Upton Co., TX.

3 William Rufus Rankin, b. 7 Mar 1823, Gaston Co., NC, d. 17 Nov 1883, Gaston Co. Wife #1 Mary Ann (possibly Capps?, 23 Feb 1826 – 6 Mar 1850); #2 Sarah Elizabeth Stowe (8 Apr 1840 – 28 Aug 1892). William Rufus Rankin’s first three children (William Gamewell, Laura and James) were children of his first wife Mary Ann. The remaining 9 children (Whiten through Price) were children of Sarah Elizabeth Stowe.

4 William Gamewell Rankin, 9 Mar 1844 – 12 Feb 1900. Wife Elvira A. Leeper (16 May 1840-11 Feb 1916).

5 Sallie Rankin, b. abt 1864, Gaston Co., NC.

5 Wiley Theodore Rankin, 24 Sep 1867 – 18 Dec 1929. Wife #1 Lula Ford (mother of all his children); wife #2 Lillie Johnston, married 24 Sep 1902, Gaston Co.

6 Mildred Rankin, b. 17 Jun 1893, Gaston Co., d. 2 Feb 1941, Gastonia, NC. Husband Haddon Spurgeon Mackie (1891-1970).

7 Wiley Theodore Mackie, b. 13 Jul 1920 – 11 Sep 1943.

7 Mary Lou Mackie m. Alton F. Bryant.

6 Eleanor or Emma? Rankin, b. 24 Sep 1896. Husband John D. Kennedy. Broward Co., Ft. Lauderdale, FL.

6 William Theodore Rankin, b. 24 Nov 1898, Gastonia, d. 4 Apr 1952, Gastonia. Co. Wife Mary Payne, married 25 Apr 1929.

7 Wiley Theodore Rankin, 7 Oct 1930 – 14 Dec 1999. Wife #1 Jeanette Adams; wife #2 Hally Lee.

6 Lula Rankin, 6 Nov 1900 – 2 Feb 1985, Gastonia.

5 Mary A. Rankin, 1870 – 22 Aug 1919. Husband Charles Clyde Craig.

5 Edward Jenkins Rankin, 26 Dec 1872 – 28 Aug 1950. Wife Emma Mary Stowe.

6 Annie Lucille Rankin, 23 Feb 1900 – Nov 1992. Never married.

6 Margaret S. Rankin, b. 19 July 1909.

5 Laura Luna Rankin, 12 Dec 1875 – 17 Jan 1945. Husband John Taylor Harrison.

5 Emma F. Rankin, b. 6 Oct 1878, d. 22 Feb 1957, Gastonia.

5 John Ralph Rankin, 6 May 1881 – 2 Oct 1920. Wife Victoria May Grischy.

6 James Robert Rankin, b. 15 Apr 1907, Gastonia, d. Mar 1982. Wife Eugenia White.

6 William Rankin, b. 1910.

5 Rufus Andrew Rankin (Sr.), b. 15 Oct 1882 d. 11 Jan 1933, Gastonia. Wife Minnie Jane Armstrong.

6 Evelyn Rankin, 16 Jan 1907 – 30 Aug 1999, Gaston Co. Husband John Paul Stowe.

6 Mary Ruth Rankin, 6 Nov 1908 – 1 Jul 1977, Alamance Co., NC. Husband Henry W. Jordan.

6 Rufus A. Rankin Jr., b. 1 Aug 1911, Gastonia, d. 6 Jan 1985, Kilmamock, Lancaster Co., VA. Wife Dorothea Edwards Higgins, m. Richmond, Henrico Co., VA.

7 Rufus A. Rankin III, 25 Sep 1940 – 26 May 1994, Lancaster Co., VA.

7 Henry L. Rankin.

6 Alice E. Rankin, 16 Nov 1913, Gaston Co. – Feb 2003, Gastonia. Husband Wilson Alexander Forbes.

6 Robert Wray Rankin, 10 Sep 1917 – 22 Jul 1958. Wife Jane Elizabeth Boren.

6 Helen Franklin Rankin, b. about 1921. Husband Harry Tracy Westcott, m. in Randolph Co., NC.

6 Samuel Armstrong Rankin, b. 12 Aug 1923, d. 29 Oct 1994, Randolph Co., NC. Wife Cornelia Stevens Lowe.

4 Laura Rankin, 29 Mar 1846 – 10 Jan 1906.

4 James (“Mack”?) Rankin, b. Mar. 1850.

4 Whiten Robertus Rankin, b. 3 Feb 1857, d. 19 Jul 1946, South Point, Gaston Co. Wife Judith Elizabeth McKee.

5 Thomas Pinkney Rankin, b. 19 Aug 1880, wife Vivian Pearl Leonhardt.

6 Roberta Rankin, 1904-1976, husband George Blakey Smith.

6 Thomas Pinkney Rankin Jr., b. 25 Jun 1910, Lowell, Gaston Co., d. 18 Jun 1978.

6 Bennie Vivian Rankin, b. 18 Mar 1918, Lowell, d. 28 Jan 1995, Malvern, Hot Springs Co., AR. Husband Glenn Baker.

6 Eugene Malcom Rankin, b. 17 Aug 1922, Lowell, d. 31 Jan 2016, Greenwich, Conn.

5 Zada Rankin, b. 17 Aug 1882, Gaston Co.

5 John Robert Rankin, b. 14 Mar 1885, Gaston Co. Wife Clara E. Sloan.

6 James W. Rankin, b. 20 Oct 1914, Gastonia, d. Feb 1987, Greensboro, Guilford Co. Wife Susan Porter Calder.

6 Sarah E. Rankin, b. abt 1917, Gastonia.

6 Robert Sloan Rankin, b. 23 Feb 1920, Gastonia, d. 14 Aug 1998, Hilton Head, SC.

5 Sarah Katie Rankin, b. 20 Dec 1887, Gaston Co.

5 Annie Minerva Rankin, b. 4 Feb 1891, Gaston Co.

5 Georgia May Rankin, b. 17 May 1894, Gaston Co.

5 Lyda Violet Rankin, b. 5 Dec 1898, Gaston Co.

4 Andrew Johnson Rankin, b. 21 Jan 1859, d. 11 Nov. 1936, Gastonia. Wife Emily Ann Smith (7 May 1858-27 Dec 1937).

5 Margaret Elva Rankin, 29 Nov 1884 – 2 May 1981, Gastonia. Husband John Pinchback Chandler.

5 Ida Myrtle Rankin, 24 Mar 1888 – 14 Feb 1981, Gastonia. Husband Samuel Sidney Shuford.

5 Sarah Edna Rankin, 6 Jul 1889 – 20 Jul 1987, never married.

4 Rufus Pinkney Rankin, b. 16 Feb 1862 d. 1 Nov 1910, Gastonia. Wife Zoe Anna Hand.

5 Rufus Grady Rankin Sr., 25 Feb 1891 – 13 Jun 1976, Charlotte, Mecklenburg Co. Wife Ruth Boyce.

6 Anna Boyce Rankin, b. 18 Jan 1914, d. 10 Feb 2011, Charlotte, Mecklenburg Co.. Husband Joseph William Lineberger.

6 Rufus Grady Rankin Jr., b. 3 Jul 1918, d. 12 May 1997. Married #1 Margore Louise Crist, Caldwell Co., NC; m. wife #2 in Collier Co., FL.

6 David Holland Rankin, b. 18 Jul 1922, d. 28 Dec 2013, Charlotte, NC. Wife Nancy Fidelia O’Herron.

7 David Holland Rankin Jr.

7 Betty Rankin, m. Richard Hecenbleikner.

7 Samuel Boyce Rankin, wife Susan.

7 Michael O’Herron Rankin, wife Kay.

6 George Mason Rankin, b. 18 May 1924, d. 12 Jun 1969, Asheville, Buncombe Co. Wife Ann Rawley Long.

5 Sarah Violet Rankin, b. 16 Jun 1893, d. 16 Jan 1969, Gastonia. Husband George B. Mason.

5 Henry Rankin, b. 26 Oct 1895, d. 21 Oct 1964, Durham, NC. Wife Mary Olive Reed.

6 Patricia Rankin, b. 21 Mar 1921, Gastonia.

5 Lawrence Samuel Rankin, b. 20 Mar 1898, d. 6 Feb 1978, Gastonia. Wife Sadie Love Thomson.

6 Lawrence Rankin Jr., 3 Sep 1924 – 12 Jan 1998.

6 James Thomson Rankin, 12 May 1927 – 29 Mar 1992, Gastonia. Wife Barbara Grigg.

6 Robert Hand Rankin, b. 12 May 1929, d. 18 Sep 1998, Gastonia.

5 Rufus Pinkney Rankin Jr., b. 23 Jan 1902, d. 26 May 1992, Charlotte, Mecklenburg Co., NC. Wife Jessie Gray Boggs, 27 Dec 1922. Buried Oakwood Cemetery, Gastonia.

4 Robert Franklin Rankin, b. 17 Jan 1866, d. 14 Dec 1960, Wilmington, New Hanover Co., NC.  Wife #1: Sarah Ella Jenkins (mother of Nellie, Campbell and Robert); wife #2, Anna Jane Wells (mother of Sarah, Graham and Cecil); wife #3, Florence Rackley, (mother of Juanita, Charles, Pinkney Ray, Margaret Elizabeth, Ruth L., Lillian, Coy, and Wilton).

5 Nellie Rankin, b. Mar 1890, Gaston Co.

5 David Campbell Rankin, b. 17 Mar 1892 – d. 14 May 1962, Charleston, Charleston Co., SC.

5 Robert Richard Rankin, b. 24 Feb 1894 – d. 28 Apr 1972, Charlotte, Mecklenburg Co., NC.

5 Sarah E. Rankin, b. 10 Aug 1898 – d. 23 Nov 1985, Charlotte, Mecklenburg Co. Husband Ross Orr McConnell.

5 Graham Franklin Rankin, b. 23 Dec 1902, d. 5 Oct 1958, Staunton, Augusta Co., VA. Wife Margaret Dunn.

6 Robert Frank Rankin, b. 8 Aug 1924, Charlotte, d. 18 Jun 2015, Staunton, Augusta Co., VA.

5 Cecil Coke Rankin, b. 30 Jan 1905, Mt. Holly, Gaston Co., d. 16 Aug 1965, Gastonia, Gaston Co. Wife Margaret Grice.

5 Juanita Victoria Rankin, b. 23 Apr 1909, Mt. Holly – d. 2 Apr 1994, Wilmington, New Hanover Co., NC.

5 Pinkney Ray Rankin, b. 20 Aug 1910, Mt. Holly, Gaston Co., d. 25 Sep 1999, Charlotte, Mecklenburg Co., NC. Wife Ruby Stokes. His obituary says his Scots-Irish Rankins came from North Ireland (sic, should be northern Ireland) to PA in the early 1700s.

6 Martha Ann Rankin

6 Michael Ray Rankin

5 Charles Wesley Rankin, b. 10 Dec 1911, Mt. Holly.

5 Margaret Elisabeth Rankin, b. 29 Mar 1913, Mt. Holly.

5 Ruth L. Rankin, b. abt 1916, m. Mr. Nimrocks.

5 Lillian Bowles Rankin, b. 21 Nov 1917, Gastonia, Gaston Co., NC, m. Robert Morris, 6 Nov 1937, New Hanover Co., NC, d. 6 Aug 2016, Durham Co., NC.

5 Fannie Coy Rankin, b. abt. 1920, m. Theron Carl Pate 28 May 1939, Franklin Co., VA.

5 Wilton Rankin, b. 11 Sep 1927, Wilmington, NC., d. Charlotte, Mecklenburg Co., NC 12 April 2017. Wife Tiffany W. LNU.

6 William T. Rankin

6 Diane V. Rankin

6 Donna M. Davis

4 Mary Eliza Rankin, 1868 – 1900. Husband Charles Hall Lineberger.

4 Larkin Edgar Rankin, b. 10 Feb 1870, d. 28 Aug 1935, Gastonia. Wife Jennie Lineberger Hand.

5 William Lamar Rankin, b. 13 Dec 1893, d. 3 Oct 1966, Cleveland Co., NC, although he was a resident of Gastonia. Wife Tula Beard.

6 William Lamar Rankin, Jr., b. abt. 1919, Gaston Co. Resident of Salisbury, Rowan Co., in 1966.

6 Sam Rankin, b. abt. 1922, Gaston Co.

6 Dorothy Rankin, b. abt. 1925, Gaston Co.

6 Donald Rankin, b. abt. 1927, Gaston Co.

5 Sarah Erwin Rankin (or Erwin S., female), b. Jul 1896.

5 Larkin Ellis Rankin, b. 29 Apr 1898, d. May 1959, Highlands, Florida. Wife Lucile Evelyn Trimble or Trumbly.

6 John Daniel Rankin, b. 27 Aug 1929, Gaston, may have d. before 1940.

6 Jane Cecile Rankin, b. 29 Mar 1933, Gastonia.

5 Lois Rankin, b. 12 May 1904, Gaston.

5 Henry Hand Rankin, b. 6 Jan 1909, d. 29 Apr 1990, Charlotte, Mecklenburg Co. Wife Helen Bell.

6 Richard Henry Rankin, 21 Feb 1948 – 7 Oct 2014.

4 Nancy Jane Rankin, b. abt 1872, d. 14 Nov. 1949. Husband Charles I. Armstrong.

4 Albert Richard Rankin, b. 28 Mar 1874 – d. 30 Oct 1931, Gastonia.Wife Estella (“Stella”) Iola Jenkins.

5 Nancy Adele Rankin, 22 Nov 1900 – 30 Aug 1999, Gastonia. Husband Theodore Page Morris.

5 Annie Sloan Rankin, 1 Aug 1902 – 25 Mar 1988. Husband Allen Harold Sims.

5 Mabel Lee Rankin, 19 Feb 1906 – 21 Aug 1999, Gastonia. Husband Harry Lindley Rutter.

5 Alberta (“Berta”) R. Rankin, 3 Jan 1908 – 19 Oct 1979, Gastonia. Husband Carroll Jenkins Shelton.

5 Albert R. Rankin Jr., b. 12 Jan 1910, d. 24 Aug 1985.

5 Alice McNeill Rankin, b. 14 Jul 1913, Gastonia, d. 10 Dec 1993. Husband Edward Smith Gordon.

4 Emmett Price Rankin, 25 Sep 1876, Gaston Co., NC – 10 Jun 1954, Charlotte, Mecklenburg Co., NC.